DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

PROFILE OF THE DEPARTMENT

 

About the  Department

Department of Computer Science was established in 1998 to enable to run UGC Sponsored self financed Course in computer science  vide No. 3056/GC-I-1/98 Dated 02-12-1998. Since then it was coordinated by Department of Physics, with single contract faculty till 2012. Later Commissionerate of Collegiate Education, Government of Andhra Pradesh has appointed a regular faculty during 2011.. Consequently the department became full pledged with well-equipped laboratories, infrastructure facilities and it is unique in north costal Andhra Pradesh. The UG programme offering by the department is B. Sc Computer Science  in association with Maths, Physics and Electronic departments (MPCS & MECS). The department regularly conducts seminars, workshops and orientation programmes to motivate students & faculty towards applied sciences, improve practical skills and enhances employability as well. In addition to this the faculty of the departments offer coaching and guidance to the higher studies, consequently significant number of students from the department secures all India ranks and pursuing masters in prestigious institutions like AU, BRAU and other Central universities of all over India.

 

VISION

The vision of our department is “To be recognized as an academic department of national reputation and offer most-sought after courses in Computer Science”

MISSION

The department possesses passionate, experienced and student friendly faculty members that are committed to helping our student customers succeed

OBJECTIVES

  • To introduce advanced and interdisciplinary science courses in UG level
  • To teach advanced Computer teaching aids that facilitates better understanding of the subject
  • To understand the importance for the Computer science advancement
  • To motivate more number of students towards higher education and research
  • To develop entrepreneur and employability skills among the UG students

 

UG COURSES OFFERED

  1. Conventional Courses: B.Sc. MPCS and MECS

PG COURSES OFFERED: Nil

STUDENTS STRENGTH

Academic Year 2018- 2019:

 

S. No

 

Subject

Student Strength  

TOTAL

Male Female
1 1st MPCS & MECS 60 32 92
2 2nd MPCS & MECS 70 41 111
3 3rd  MPCS & MECS 70 20 90
Total Strength 200 93 293

Academic Year 2017- 2018:

 

S. No

 

Subject

Student Strength  

TOTAL

Male Female
1 1st MPCS & MECS 72 41 113
2 2nd MPCS & MECS 72 22 94
3 3rd  MPCS & MECS 70 33 103
Total Strength 214 96 310

Academic Year 2016- 2017:

 

S. No

 

Subject

Student Strength  

TOTAL

Male Female
1 1st MPCS & MECS 73 24 97
2 2nd MPCS & MECS 71 34 105
3 3rd  MPCS & MECS 65 15 80
Total Strength 209 73 282

 

 

 

FACILITIES AVAILABLE IN THE DEPARTMENT

 

Books in the Departmental Library:

  • Books for U.G Students                                              :  30
  • PG Entrance Books                                                 :  02
  • Complementary copies and personal books                :     25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNO PHOTO NAME QUALIFICATION DESIGNATION EMAIL-ID PROFILE
1. Dr. K.Polinaidu M.Sc., Ph.D. Lecturer-in-charge Naidu4zoology@gmail.com

 

[embeddoc url=”http://gcmsklm.in/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Dr.ypn-biodata.docx” viewer=”google”]
2. BINGI SRINIVAS M.Sc. Computer Science

 

Lecturer in Computer Science Bingi.srinu2011@gmail.com [embeddoc url=”http://gcmsklm.in/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/bingi-srinivas.doc” viewer=”google”]
3. POLAKI TARAKESWARA RAO M.Sc. ,

M.Tech(CSE)

Lecturer in Computer Science Tarak.polaki@gmail.com [embeddoc url=”http://gcmsklm.in/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/FACULTY-PROFILE-TARAK.doc” viewer=”google”]

FACULTY DETAILS

Semester Paper Subject Hrs. Credits IA ES Total
FIRST YEAR
SEMESTER I I Computer Fundamentals and Photoshop 4 3 25 75 100
Photo Shop Lab 2 2 0 50 50
SEMESTER II II Programming in C 4 3 25 75 100
Programming in C Lab 2 2 0 50 50
SECOND YEAR
SEMESTER III III Object Oriented Programming Using Java 4 3 25 75 100
Object Oriented Programming Using Java Lab 2 2 0 50 50
SEMESTER IV IV Data Structures 4 3 25 75 100
Data Structures using Java Lab 2 2 0 50 50
THIRD YEAR
SEMESTER V V DBMS 3 3 25 75 100
DBMS  Lab 2 2 0 50 50
VI Software Engineering 3 3 25 75 100
Software Engineering Lab 2 2 0 50 50
SEMESTER VI  

VII

(A/B/C)

 

 

Elective-I 3 3 25 75 100
  1. Operating Systems
  1. Computer Networks
  1. Web  Technologies
Lab for Elective –I 2 2 0 50 50
VIII

Cluster-A-1,2,3 or

Cluster-B-1,2,3

 

Elective-II(cluster A)
1.Foundations of Data Science 3 3 25 75 100
2.Big Data Technology
3.Computing for Data Analytics
Project Work 2 2 20 30 50
Elective-II(cluster B)
1. Distributed Systems 3 3 25 75 100
2. Cloud Computing
3. Grid computing
Project Work 2 2 20 30 50

 

 

 

I YEAR 1 SEMESTER

 

Computer Fundamentals & Photoshop

 

Course Outcome

To explore basic knowledge on computers and Photoshop’s beauty from the practical to the painterly artistic and to understand how Photoshop will help you create your own successful images

 

UNIT-I:

Introduction to computers, characteristics and limitations of computer, Block diagram of computer, types of computers, uses of computers, computer generations. Number systems :binary, hexa and octal numbering system

 

UNIT-II:

Input and output devices: Keyboard and mouse, inputting data in other ways, Types of Software: system software, Application software, commercial, open source, domain and free ware software, Memories: primary, secondary and cache memory. Windows basics: desktop, start menu, icons.

 

Unit –III

Introduction  to Adobe photoshop, Getting started with photoshop,  creating and saving a document in photoshop, page layout and back ground, photoshop program window-title bar,menu bar,option bar,image window,image title bar,status bar,ruler,paletts,tool box,screen modes,saving files,reverting files,closing files.

 

Unit –IV

Images: working with images, image size and resolution ,image editing,colour modes and adjustments , Zooming & Panning an Image,, , Rulers, Guides & Grids- Cropping & Straightening an Image,image  backgrounds ,making selections.

Working with tool box: working with pen tool, save and load selection-working with erasers-working with text and brushes-Colour manipulations: colour modes- Levels – Curves – Seeing Colour accurately – Patch tool – Cropping-Reading your palettes – Dust and scratches- Advanced Retouching- smoothing skin

 

Unit-V

Layers: Working with layers- layer styles- opacity-adjustment layers

Filters: The filter menu, Working with filters- Editing your photo shoot,  presentation –how to create adds ,artstic filter,blur filter,brush store filter,distort filters,noice filters,pixelate filters,light effects,difference clouds,sharpen filters,printing.

 

 

Reference  Books:

  1. Fundamentals of Computers by Reema Thareja from Oxford University Press
  2. Adobe Photoshop Class Room in a Book by Adobe Creative Team.
  3. Photoshop: Beginner’s Guide for Photoshop – Digital Photography, Photo Editing, Color Grading & Graphic…19 February 2016 by David Maxwell

 

Student Activity:

  1. Design a poster for technical paper presentation.
  2. Create a digital scrap book.

 

 

Photo Shop Lab

 

  1. Create your Visiting card
  2. Create Cover page for any text book
  3. Create a Paper add for advertising of any commercial agency
  4. Design a Passport photo
  5. Create a Pamphlet for any program to be conducted by an organixation
  6. Create Broacher for you college
  7. Create Titles for any forthcoming film
  8. Custom shapes creation
  9. Create a Web template for your college
  10. Convert color photo to black and white photo
  11. Enhance and reduce the given Image size
  12. Background changes
  13. Design Box package cover
  14. Design Texture and patterns
  15. Filter effects & Eraser effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I YEAR II SEMESTER

 

Paper-II : PROGRAMMING IN C

Course Objectives

  1. Learn how to solve common types of computing problems.
  2. Learn data types and control structures of C
  3. Learn to map problems to programming features of C.
  4. Learn to write good portable C programs.

Course Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, a student will be able to:

  1. Appreciate and understand the working of a digital computer
  2. Analyze a given problem and develop an algorithm to solve the problem
  3. Improve upon a solution to a problem
  4. Use the ‘C’ language constructs in the right way
  5. Design, develop and test programs written in ‘C’

 

UNIT I

Introduction to Algorithms and Programming Languages: Algorithm – Key features of Algorithms – Some more Algorithms – Flow Charts – Pseudo code – Programming Languages – Generation of Programming Languages – Structured Programming Language- Design and Implementation of Correct, Efficient and Maintainable Programs.

Introduction to C: Introduction – Structure of C Program – Writing the first C Program – File used in C Program – Compiling and Executing C Programs – Using Comments – Keywords – Identifiers – Basic Data Types in C – Variables – Constants – I/O Statements in C- Operators in C- Programming Examples – Type Conversion and Type Casting

 

UNIT II

Decision Control and Looping Statements: Introduction to Decision Control Statements – Conditional Branching Statements – Iterative Statements – Nested Loops – Break and Continue Statement – Goto Statement

Functions: Introduction – using functions – Function declaration/ prototype – Function definition – function call – return statement – Passing parameters – Scope of variables – Storage Classes – Recursive functions – Type of recursion – Towers of Hanoi – Recursion vs Iteration

 

UNIT III

Arrays: Introduction – Declaration of Arrays – Accessing elements of the Array – Storing Values in Array – Calculating the length of the Array – Operations on Array – one dimensional array for inter-function communication – Two dimensional Arrays –Operations on Two Dimensional Arrays – Two Dimensional Arrays for inter-function communication – Multidimensional Arrays – Sparse Matrices

Strings: Introduction –Suppressive Input – String Taxonomy – String Operations – Miscellaneous String and Character functions

 

 

 

UNIT IV

Pointers: Understanding Computer Memory – Introduction to Pointers – declaring Pointer Variables – Pointer Expressions and Pointer Arithmetic – Null Pointers – Generic Pointers – Passing Arguments to Functions using Pointer – Pointer and Arrays – Passing Array to Function – Difference between Array Name and Pointer – Pointers and Strings – Array of pointers – Pointer and 2D Arrays – Pointer and 3D Arrays – Function Pointers – Array 0f Function Pointer – Pointers to Pointers – Memory Allocation in C Programs – Memory Usage – Dynamic Memory Allocation – Drawbacks of Pointers

Structure, Union, and Enumerated Data Types: Introduction – Nested Structures – Arrays of Structures – Structures and Functions – Self referential Structures – Union – Arrays of Unions Variables – Unions inside Structures – Enumerated Data Types

 

UNIT V

Files: Introduction to Files – Using Files in C – Reading Data from Files – Writing Data from Files – Detecting the End-of-file – Error Handling during File Operations – Accepting Command Line Arguments – Functions for Selecting a Record Randomly –  Remove() – Renaming a File – Creating a Temporary File

 

REFERENCE BOOKS

 

  1. Introduction to C programming  by REEMA THAREJA from OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
  2. E Balagurusamy: ―COMPUTING FUNDAMENTALS & C PROGRAMMING – Tata McGraw-Hill, Second Reprint 2008, ISBN 978-0-07-066909-3.
  3. Ashok N Kamthane: Programming with ANSI and Turbo C, Pearson Edition Publ, 2002.
  4. Henry Mullish & Huubert L.Cooper: The Spirit of C An Introduction to modern Programming, Jaico Pub. House,1996.

 

Student Activity:

  1. Write a program for preparing the attendance particulars of students of your college at the end of semester according to following guidelines
  2. Above 75 % promoted
  3. Above 65% condoned
  4. Below 65% detained
  5. Write a program for creating timetable or your class taking work load of faculty into consideration.

 

PROGRAMMING IN C LAB

 

  1. Find out the given number is perfect number or not using c program.
  2. Write a C program to check whether the given number is Armstrong or not.
  3. Write a C program to find the sum of individual digits of a positive integer.
  4. A Fibonacci sequence is defined as follows: the first and second terms in the sequence are 0 and 1. Subsequent terms are found by adding the preceding two terms in the sequence. Write a C program to print the Fibonacci series
  5. Write a C program to generate the first n terms of the Fibonacci sequence.
  6. Write a C program to generate all the prime numbers between 1 and n, where n is a value supplied by the user.
  7. Write a C program to find both the largest and smallest number in a list of integers.
  8. Write a C program that uses functions to perform the following:
    1. Addition of Two Matrices
    2. Multiplication of Two Matrices
  9. Write a program to perform various string operations
  10. Write C program that implements searching of given item in a given list
  11. Write a C program to sort a given list of integers in ascending order

 

 

II YEAR III SEMESTER

 

Paper-III : OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA

Course Objectives

As the business environment becomes more sophisticated, the software development (software engineering is about managing complexity) is becoming increasingly complex. As of the best programming paradigm which helps to eliminate complexity of large projects, Object Oriented Programming (OOP) has become the predominant technique for writing software in the past decade. Many other important software development techniques are based upon the fundamental ideas captured by object-oriented programming.

Course Outcomes

At the end of this course student will:

  1. Understand the concept and underlying principles of Object-Oriented Programming
  2. Understand how object-oriented concepts are incorporated into the Java programming language
  3. Develop problem-solving and programming skills using OOP concept
  4. Understand the benefits of a well structured program
  5. Develop the ability to solve real-world problems through software development in high-level programming language like Java
  6. Develop efficient Java applets and applications using OOP concept
  7. Become familiar with the fundamentals and acquire programming skills in the Java language.

UNIT-1

 FUNDAMENTALS OF OBJECT – ORIENTED PROGRAMMING :Introduction, Object Oriented paradigm, Basic Concepts of OOP, Benefits of OOP, Applications of OOP, Java features: OVERVIEW OF JAVA LANGUAGE: Introduction, Simple Java program structure, Java tokens, Java Statements, Implementing a Java Program, Java Virtual Machine, Command line arguments. CONSTANTS, VARIABLES & DATA TYPES: Introduction, Constants, Variables, Data Types, Declaration of Variables, Giving Value to Variables, Scope of variables, Symbolic Constants, Type casting, Getting Value of Variables, Standard Default values; OPERATORS & EXPRESSIONS.

UNIT-II

DECISION MAKING & BRANCHING: Introduction, Decision making with if statement, Simple if statement,  if. Else statement, Nesting of if. else statements, the else if ladder, the switch statement, the conditional operator.  LOOPING: Introduction, The While statement, the do-while statement, the for statement, Jumps in loops.

CLASSES, OBJECTS & METHODS: Introduction, Defining a class, Adding variables, Adding methods, Creating objects, Accessing class members, Constructors, Method overloading, Static members, Nesting of methods;

UNIT-III

INHERITANCE: Extending a class, Overloading methods, Final variables and methods, Final classes,  Abstract methods and classes;

ARRAYS, STRINGS AND VECTORS: Arrays, One-dimensional arrays, Creating an array, Two – dimensional arrays, Strings, Vectors, Wrapper classes;

INTERFACES: MULTIPLE INHERITANCE: Introduction, Defining interfaces, Extending interfaces, Implementing interfaces, Assessing interface variables;

UNIT-IV

MULTITHREADED PROGRAMMING: Introduction, Creating Threads, Extending the Threads, Stopping and Blocking a Thread, Lifecycle of a Thread, Using Thread Methods, Thread Exceptions, Thread Priority, Synchronization, Implementing the ‘Runnable’ Interface.

MANAGING ERRORS AND EXCEPTIONS: Types of errors : Compile-time errors, Run-time errors, Exceptions, Exception handling, Multiple Catch Statements, Using finally statement,

UNIT-V

APPLET PROGRAMMING: local and remote applets, Applets and Applications, Building Applet code, Applet Life cycle: Initialization state, Running state, Idle or stopped state, Dead state, Display state.

PACKAGES: Introduction, Java API Packages, Using System Packages, Naming conventions, Creating Packages, Accessing a Package, using a Package.

MANAGING INPUT/OUTPUT FILES IN JAVA: Introduction, Concept of Streams, Stream classes, Byte Stream Classes, Input Stream Classes, Output Stream Classes, Character Stream classes: Reader stream classes, Writer Stream classes, Using Streams, Reading and writing files.

Reference Books:

  1. Balaguruswamy, Programming with JAVA, A primer, 3e, TATA McGraw-Hill

Company.

  1. John R. Hubbard, Programming with Java, Second Edition, Schaum’s outline Series, TATA McGraw-Hill Company.
  2. Deitel &Deitel. Java TM: How to Program, PHI (2007)
  3. Java Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design- D.S Mallik

 

  1. Object Oriented Programming Through Java by P. Radha Krishna, Universities Press (2008)

Student Activity:

  1. Create a front end using JAVA for the student database created
  2. Learn the difference between ODBC and JDBC

 

 

 

 

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING JAVA LAB

 

 

  1. Write a program to perform various String Operations
  2. Write a program on class and object in java
  3. Write a program to illustrate Function Overloading & Function Overriding methods in Java
  4. Write a program to illustrate the implementation of abstract class
  5. Write a program to implement Exception handling
  6. Write a program to create packages in Java
  7. Write a program on interface in java
  8. Write a program to Create Multiple Threads in Java
  9. Write a program to Write Applets to draw the various polygons
  10. Write a program which illustrates the implementation of multiple Inheritance using interfaces in Java
  11. Write a program to assign priorities to threads in java

 

II YEAR IV SEMESTER

 

Paper-IV : DATA STRUCTURES

Course Objectives

 

To introduce the fundamental concept of data structures and to emphasize the importance of data structures in developing and implementing efficient algorithms..

 

Course Outcomes

 

After completing this course satisfactorily, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe how arrays, records, linked structures, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs are represented in memory and used by algorithms
  2. Describe common applications for arrays, records, linked structures, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs.
  3.  Write programs that use arrays, records, linked structures, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs
  4. Demonstrate different methods for traversing trees
  5. Compare alternative implementations of data structures with respect to performance
  6. Compare and contrast the benefits of dynamic and static data structures implementations
  7. Describe the concept of recursion, give examples of its use, describe how it can be implemented using a stack .
  8. Discuss the computational efficiency of the principal algorithms for sorting, searching, and hashing.

 

UNIT I

Concept of Abstract Data Types (ADTs)- Data Types, Data Structures, Storage Structures, and   File  Structures, Primitive and Non-primitive Data Structures, Linear  and   Non-linear  Data Structures.

Linear Lists – ADT, Array and Linked representations, Pointers.

Arrays – ADT, Mappings, Representations, Sparse Matrices,   Sets – ADT, Operations

Linked Lists: Single Linked List, Double Linked List, Circular Linked List , applications

 

UNIT II

Stacks: Definition, ADT, Array and Linked representations, Implementations and Applications

Queues: Definition, ADT, Array and Linked representations, Circular Queues, Dequeues, Priority Queues,  Implementations and Applications.

 

UNIT III

Trees: Binary Tree, Definition, Properties, ADT, Array and Linked representations,   Implementations   and Applications. Binary Search Trees (BST) – Definition, ADT, Operations and Implementations, BST Applications. Threaded Binary Trees, Heap trees.

 

UNIT IV                       

Graphs – Graph and its Representation, Graph Traversals, Connected Components, Basic Searching Techniques, Minimal Spanning Trees

 

UNIT- V

Sorting and Searching: Selection, Insertion, Bubble, Merge, Quick, Heap sort, Sequential and Binary Searching.

 

REFERENCE BOOKS

  1. D S Malik, Data Structures Using C++, Thomson, India Edition 2006.
  2. Sahni S, Data Structures, Algorithms and Applications in C++, McGraw-Hill, 2002.
  3. SamantaD, Classic Data Structures, Prentice-Hall of India, 2001.
  4. Heilman G I,. Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Programming, Tata McGraw-l lill. 2002. (Chapters I and 14).
  5. Tremblay P, and Sorenson P G, Introduction to Data Structures  with  Applications, Tata McGraw-Hill,

 

 

Student activity:

  1. Create a visible stack using C-graphics
  2. Create a visible Queue using C-graphics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA STRUCTURES USING JAVA LAB

 

  1. Write a Program to implement the Linked List operations
  2. Write a Program to implement the Stack operations using an array.
  3. Write Programs to implement the Queue operations using an array.
  4. Write Programs to implement the Stack operations using a singly linked list.
  5. Write Programs to implement the Queue operations using a singly linked list.
  6. Write a program for arithmetic expression evaluation
  7. Write a program to implement Double Ended Queue using a doubly linked list.
  8. Write a program to search an item in a given list using Linear Search and Binary Search
  9. Write a program for Quick Sort
  10. Write a program for Merge Sort
  11. Write a program on Binary Search Tree operations(insertion, deletion and traversals)
  12. Write a program for Graph traversals

 

 

III YEAR V SEMESTER

Paper-V:  Data Base Management System

 

Course Objective:

 

Design & develop database for large volumes & varieties of data with optimized data processing techniques.

 

Course Outcomes

 

On completing the subject, students will be able to:

  1. Design and model of data in database.
  2. Store, Retrieve data in database.

 

 

UNIT I

 

Overview of Database Management System: Introduction, file-based system, Drawbacks of file-Based System ,Data and information, Database, Database management System, Objectives of DBMS, Evaluation of Database management System, Classification of Database Management System, DBMS Approach, advantages of DBMS, Anis/spark Data Model, data models, Components and Interfaces of Database Management System. Database Architecture, Situations where DBMS is not Necessary, DBMS Vendors and Their Products.

 

UNIT II

 

Entity-Relationship Model: Introduction, the building blocks of an entity relationship diagram, classification of entity sets, attribute classification, relationship degree, relationship classification, reducing ER diagram to tables, enhanced entity-relationship model (EER model), generalization and specialization, IS A relationship and attribute inheritance, multiple inheritance, constraints on specialization and generalization, aggregation and composition, entity clusters, connection types, advantages of ER modeling.

 

UNIT III

Relational Model: Introduction, CODD Rules, relational data model, concept of key, relational integrity, relational algebra, relational algebra operations, advantages of relational algebra, limitations of relational algebra, relational calculus, tuple relational calculus,domain relational Calculus (DRC). QBE

 

UNIT IV

 

Structured Query Language: Introduction, History of SQL Standard, Commands in SQL, Data Types in SQL, Data Definition Language, Selection Operation, Projection Operation, Aggregate functions, Data Manipulation Language, Table Modification Commands, Table Truncation, Imposition of Constraints, Join Operation, Set Operation,

View, Sub Query, Embedded SQL,

 

 

 

UNIT V

 

PL/SQL: Introduction, Shortcoming in SQL, Structure of PL/SQL, PL/SQL Language Elements, Data Types, Operators Precedence, Control Structure, Steps to Create a

PL/SQL, Program, Iterative Control, Cursors, Steps to create a Cursors, Procedure,

Function, Packages, Exceptions Handling, Database Triggers, Types of Triggers.

 

Reference Books

 

  1. “Database System Concepts” by Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth, and S.

Sudarshan, McGrawhill, 2010, 9780073523323

  1. “Database Management Systems” by Raghu Ramakrishnan, McGrawhill, 2002,
  2. Fundamentals of Relational Database Management Systems by S. Sumathi, S.

Esakkirajan, Springer Publications

  1. “An Introduction to Database Systems” by Bipin C Desai
  2. “Principles of Database Systems” by J. D. Ullman
  3. “Fundamentals of Database Systems” by R. Elmasri and S. Navathe

 

 

Student Activity:

  1. Create your college database for placement purpose.
  2. Create faculty database of your college with their academic performance scores

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR V SEMESTER

 

DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS LAB

 

  1. Draw ER diagrams for train services in a railway station
  2. Draw ER diagram for hospital administration
  3. Creation of college database and establish relationships between tables
  4. Write a view to extract details from two or more tables
  5. Write a stored procedure to process students results
  6. Write a program to demonstrate a function
  7. Write a program to demonstrate blocks, cursors & database triggers.
  8. Write a program to demonstrate Joins
  9. Write a program d
  10. Write a program to demonstrate of  Aggregate functions
  11. Creation of Reports based on different queries
  12. Usage of file locking table locking, facilities in applications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR V SEMESTER

Paper VI : Software Engineering

Course Objectives

The Objective of the course is to assist the student in understanding the basic theory of software engineering, and to apply these basic theoretical principles to a group software development project.

Course outcomes

  1. Ability to gather and specify requirements of the software projects.
  2. Ability to analyze software requirements with existing tools
  3. Able to differentiate different testing methodologies
  4. Able to understand and apply the basic project management practices in real life projects
  5. Ability to work in a team as well as independently on software projects

 

 

UNIT I 

 

INTRODUCTION: Software Engineering Process paradigms – Project management – Process and Project Metrics – software estimation – Empirical estimation models – Planning – Risk analysis – Software project scheduling.

 

UNIT II

REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS : Requirement Engineering Processes – Feasibility Study – Problem of Requirements – Software Requirement Analysis – Analysis Concepts and Principles – Analysis Process – Analysis Model

 

UNIT III

SOFTWARE DESIGN: Software design – Abstraction – Modularity – Software Architecture – Effective modular design – Cohesion and Coupling – Architectural design and Procedural design – Data flow oriented design.

 

UNIT IV

USER INTERFACE DESIGN AND REAL TIME SYSTEMS :User interface design – Human factors – Human computer interaction – Human – Computer Interface design – Interface design – Interface standards.

 

UNIT V

SOFTWARE QUALITY AND TESTING :Software Quality Assurance – Quality metrics – Software Reliability – Software testing – Path testing – Control Structures testing – Black Box testing – Integration, Validation and system testing – Reverse Engineering and Re-engineering.

CASE tools –projects management, tools – analysis and design tools – programming tools – integration and testing tool – Case studies.

 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

  1. Roger Pressman S., “Software Engineering: A Practitioner’s Approach”, 7th

Edition, McGraw Hill, 2010.

  1. Software Engineering Principles and Practice by Deepak Jain Oxford University Press
  2. Sommerville, “Software Engineering”, Eighth Edition, Pearson Education, 2007
  3. Pfleeger, “Software Engineering: Theory & Practice”, 3rd Edition, Pearson

Education, 2009

  1. Carlo Ghazi, Mehdi Jazayari, Dino Mandrioli, “Fundamentals of Software

Engineering”, Pearson Education, 2003

 

 

Student Activity:

  1. Visit any financial organization nearby and prepare requirement analysis report
  2. Visit any industrial organization and prepare risk chart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR V SEMESTER

Software Engineering Lab

 

  1. Studying various phases of Water-Fall Model.
  2. Prepare SRS for Banking or On line book store domain problem
  3. Using COCOMO model estimate effort for Banking or on line book store domain problem.
  4. Calculate effort using FP oriented estimation model
  5. Analyze the Risk related to the project and prepare RMMM plan.
  6. Develop Time-line chart and project table using PERT or CPM project scheduling methods.
  7. Draw E-R diagram, DFD, CFD and STD for the project.
  8. Design of the test cases.
  9. Prepare FTR. Version control and change control for software configuration item

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

Paper-VII: Elective-A

Operating Systems

Course Objectives

 

  1. To understand the services provided by and the design of an operating system.
  2. To understand the structure and organization of the file system.
  3. To understand what a process is and how processes are synchronized and scheduled.
  4. To understand different approaches to memory management.
  5. Students should be able to use system calls for managing processes, memory and the file system.

 

Course Outcomes

 

  1. Analyze the concepts of processes in operating system and illustration of the scheduling of processor for a given problem instance.
  2. Identify the dead lock situation and provide appropriate solution so that protection and security of the operating system is also maintained.
  3. Analyze memory management techniques, concepts of virtual memory and disk scheduling.
  4. Understand the implementation of file systems and directories along with the interfacing of IO devices with the operating system.

 

UNIT – I

Operating System Introduction: Operating Systems Objectives and functions, Computer System Architecture, OS Structure, OS Operations, Evolution of Operating Systems – Simple Batch, Multi programmed, time shared, Parallel, Distributed Systems, Real-Time Systems, Operating System services.

UNIT – II

Process and CPU Scheduling – Process concepts – The Process, Process State, Process Control Block, Threads, Process Scheduling – Scheduling Queues, Schedulers, Context Switch, Preemptive Scheduling, Dispatcher, Scheduling Criteria, Scheduling algorithms, Case studies: Linux, Windows.

Process Coordination – Process Synchronization, The Critical section Problem, Synchronization Hardware, Semaphores, and Classic Problems of Synchronization, Monitors, Case Studies: Linux, Windows.

UNIT – III

Memory Management and Virtual Memory – Logical & physical Address Space, Swapping, Contiguous Allocation, Paging, Structure of Page Table. Segmentation, Segmentation with Paging, Virtual Memory, Demand Paging, Performance of Demanding Paging, Page Replacement Page Replacement Algorithms, Allocation of Frames.

UNIT – IV

File System Interface – The Concept of a File, Access methods, Directory Structure, File System Mounting, File Sharing, Protection, File System Structure,

Mass Storage Structure – Overview of Mass Storage Structure, Disk Structure, Disk  Attachment, Disk Scheduling.

UNIT – V

Deadlocks – System Model, Deadlock Characterization, Methods for Handling Deadlocks, Deadlock Prevention, Deadlock Avoidance, Deadlock Detection and Recovery from Deadlock.

.

REFERENCES BOOKS: 

  1. Operating System Principles, Abraham Silberchatz, Peter B. Galvin, Greg Gagne 8th Edition, Wiley Student Edition.
  2. Principles of Operating Systems by Naresh Chauhan, OXFORD University Press
  3. Operating systems – Internals and Design Principles, W. Stallings, 6th Edition, Pearson.
  4. Modern Operating Systems, Andrew S Tanenbaum 3rd Edition  PHI.
  5. Operating Systems A concept – based Approach, 2nd Edition, D. M. Dhamdhere, TMH.
  6. Principles of Operating Systems, B. L. Stuart, Cengage learning, India Edition.
  7. Operating Systems, A. S. Godbole, 2nd Edition, TMH

Student Activity:

  1. Load any new operating system into your computer.
  2. Partition the memory in your system
  3. Create a semaphore for process synchronization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

 

Paper-VII: Elective-B

COMPUTER NETWORKS

Course Objectives

 

  1. To provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts on data communication and the design of computer networks.
  2. To get familiarized with the basic protocols of computer networks.

 

Course Outcomes

After this course, the student will be able to

  1. Identify the different components in a Communication System and their respective roles.
  2. Describe the technical issues related to the local Area Networks
  3. Identify the common technologies available in establishing LAN infrastructure.

 

UNIT – I                                                                                                       

Introduction: Uses of Computer Networks, Network Hardware, Network Software, Reference Models, Example Networks.

The Physical Layer: The Theoretical Basis for Data Communication, Guided Transmission Media, Wireless transmission, the public switched telephone network

UNIT – II

The Data Link Layer: Data Link Layer Design Issues, Error Detection and Correction, Sliding Window Protocols.

The Medium Access Control Sub-layer: The channel allocation problem, Multiple Access Protocols, Ethernet, Data Link Layer Switching.

UNIT – III

The Network Layer: Network Layer Design Issues, Routing Algorithms, Congestion control algorithms, Quality of Service.

Internet Working, The Network Layer in the Internet

UNIT – IV:

The Transport Layer: The Transport Service, Elements of Transport Protocols, Congestion Control Algorithms, The Internet Transport Protocols, The Internet Transport Protocols: TCP, Delay Tolerant Networks.

 

 

UNIT – V:

The Application Layer: DNS – The Domain Name System, Electronic Mail, The World Wide Web, Real Time Audio & Video, Content Delivery & Peer-to-Peer.

 

Reference Books:

  1. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, “Computer Networks”, Fifth Edition, Pearson Education.
  2. Bhushan Trivedi, Computer Networks , Oxford University Press
  3. James F.Kurose, Keith W.Ross, “Computer Networking”, Third Edition, Pearson Education
  4. Behrouz A Forouzan, “Data Communications and Networking”, Fourth Edition, TMH (2007).
  5. Kurose & Ross, “COMPUTER NETWORKS” – A Top-down approach featuring the Internet”, Pearson Education – Alberto Leon – Garciak.

 

Student Activity:

  1. Study the functioning of network devices available in your organization .
  2. Prepare a pictorial chart of LAN connections in your organization

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

Paper-VII : Elective-C

Web Technologies

 

Course Objective

  •  To provide knowledge on web architecture, web services, client side and server side scripting technologies to focus on the development of web-based information systems and web services.
  •  To provide skills to design interactive and dynamic web sites.

Course Outcome

  1. To understand the web architecture and web services.
  2. To practice latest web technologies and tools by conducting experiments.
  3. To design interactive web pages using HTML and Style sheets.
  4. To study the framework and building blocks of .NET Integrated Development Environment.
  5. To provide solutions by identifying and formulating IT related problems.

 

UNIT – I

 

HTML: Basic HTML, Document body, Text, Hyper links, adding more formatting, Lists, Tables using images. More HTML: Multimedia objects, Frames, Forms towards interactive, HTML document heading detail

 

UNIT – II

 

Cascading Style Sheets: Introduction, using Styles, simple examples, your own styles, properties and values in styles, style sheet, formatting blocks of information, layers.

 

UNIT – III

 

Introduction to JavaScript: What is DHTML, JavaScript, basics, variables, string manipulations, mathematical functions, statements, operators, arrays, functions. Objects in JavaScript: Data and objects in JavaScript, regular expressions, exception handling

 

UNIT – IV

 

DHTML with JavaScript: Data validation, opening a new window, messages and confirmations, the status bar, different frames, rollover buttons, moving images,

 

UNIT – V

 

XML: defining data for web applications, basic XML, document type definition, presenting XML, document object model. Web Services

 

 

References:

 

  1. Harvey M. Deitel and Paul J. Deitel, “Internet & World Wide Web How to Program”, 4/e, Pearson Education.

 

  1. Uttam Kumar Roy, Web Technologies from Oxford University Press

 

 

Student Activities:

 

  1. Prepare a web site for your college

 

  1. Prepare your personal website

 

 

References:

  1. Harvey M. Deitel and Paul J. Deitel, “Internet & World Wide Web How to Program”, 4/e, Pearson Education.
  2. Uttam Kumar Roy, Web Technologies from Oxford University Press

3.      Jason Cranford Teague “Visual Quick Start Guide CSS, DHTML & AJAX”, 4e, “Pearson Education.

4.      Tom Nerino Doli smith “JavaScript & AJAX for the web” Pearson Education 2007.

5.      Joshua Elchorn “Understanding AJAX” Prentice Hall 2006.

6.      Hal Fulton “The Ruby Way”, 2e, Pearson Education 2007.

7.      David A. Black “Ruby for rails” Dreamtech Press 2006.

8.      Bill Dudney, Johathan lehr, Bill Willies, Lery Mattingly “Mastering Java Server Faces” Wiely India 2006.

 

Student Activities:

 

  1. Prepare a web site for your college
  2. Prepare your personal website

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster 1) Paper-VIII: Elective –A-1

Foundations of Data Science

 

Course Objectives

Modern scientific, engineering, and business applications are increasingly dependent on data, existing traditional data analysis technologies were not designed for the complexity of the modern world. Data Science has emerged as a new, exciting, and fast-paced discipline that explores novel statistical, algorithmic, and implementation challenges that emerge in processing, storing, and extracting knowledge from Big Data.

Course Outcomes

  1. Able to apply fundamental algorithmic ideas to process data.
  2. Learn to apply hypotheses and data into actionable predictions.
  3. Document and transfer the results and effectively communicate the findings using

visualization techniques.

 

UNIT I

 

 INTRODUCTION TO DATA SCIENCE :Data science process – roles, stages in data science project – working with data from files – working with relational databases – exploring data – managing data – cleaning and sampling for modeling and validation – introduction to NoSQL.

 

UNIT II

 

MODELING METHODS :Choosing and evaluating models – mapping problems to machine learning, evaluating clustering models, validating models – cluster analysis – K-means algorithm, Naïve Bayes – Memorization Methods – Linear and logistic regression – unsupervised methods.

 

UNIT III

 

INTRODUCTION TO R Language:Reading and getting data into R – ordered and unordered factors – arrays and matrices – lists and data frames – reading data from files – probability distributions – statistical models in R – manipulating objects – data distribution.

 

UNIT IV

 

MAP REDUCE: Introduction – distributed file system – algorithms using map reduce, Matrix-Vector Multiplication by Map Reduce – Hadoop – Understanding the Map Reduce architecture – Writing Hadoop Map Reduce Programs – Loading data into HDFS – Executing the Map phase – Shuffling and sorting – Reducing phase execution.

 

 

UNIT V

 

DELIVERING RESULTS :Documentation and deployment – producing effective presentations– Introduction to graphical analysis – plot() function – displaying multivariate data – matrix plots – multiple plots in one window – exporting graph – using graphics parameters. Case studies.

 

Reference Books

 

1.Nina Zumel, John Mount, “Practical Data Science with R”, Manning Publications, 2014.

2.Jure Leskovec, Anand Rajaraman, Jeffrey D.Ullman, “Mining of Massive Datasets”,

Cambridge University Press, 2014.

3.Mark Gardener, “Beginning R – The Statistical Programming Language”, John Wiley &

Sons, Inc., 2012.

4.W. N. Venables, D. M. Smith and the R Core Team, “An Introduction to R”, 2013.

5.Tony Ojeda, Sean Patrick Murphy, Benjamin Bengfort, Abhijit Dasgupta, “Practical Data

Science Cookbook”, Packt Publishing Ltd., 2014.

6.Nathan Yau, “Visualize This: The FlowingData Guide to Design, Visualization, and

Statistics”, Wiley, 2011.

7.Boris lublinsky, Kevin t. Smith, Alexey Yakubovich, “Professional Hadoop Solutions”,

Wiley, ISBN: 9788126551071, 2015.

 

 

Student Activity:

  1. Collect data from any real time system and create clusters using any clustering algorithm
  2. Read the student exam data in R perform statistical analysis on data and print results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster  1) Paper-VIII : Elective –A-2

 

BIG DATA TECHNOLOGY

 

Course Objective

The Objective of this course is to provide practical foundation level training that enables immediate and effective participation in big data projects. The course provides grounding in basic and advanced methods to big data technology and tools, including MapReduce and Hadoop and its ecosystem.

 

Course Outcome

 

  1. Learn tips and tricks for Big Data use cases and solutions.
  2. Learn to build and maintain reliable, scalable, distributed systems with Apache Hadoop.
  3. Able to apply Hadoop ecosystem components.

UNIT I

 

INTRODUCTION TO BIG DATA:Introduction – distributed file system – Big Data and its importance, Four V’s in bigdata, Drivers for Big data, Big data analytics, Big data applications. Algorithms using map reduce, Matrix-Vector Multiplication by Map Reduce.

 

UNIT II

 

INTRODUCTION HADOOP : Big Data – Apache Hadoop & Hadoop  EcoSystem – Moving Data in and out of Hadoop – Understanding inputs and outputs of MapReduce – Data Serialization.

 

UNIT- III

 

HADOOP ARCHITECTURE: Hadoop Architecture, Hadoop Storage: HDFS, Common Hadoop Shell commands , Anatomy of File Write and Read., NameNode, Secondary NameNode, and DataNode, Hadoop MapReduce paradigm, Map and Reduce tasks, Job, Tasktrackers – Cluster Setup – SSH & Hadoop Configuration – HDFS Administering –Monitoring & Maintenance.

 

UNIT-IV

 

HADOOP ECOSYSTEM AND YARN :Hadoop ecosystem components – Schedulers – Fair and Capacity, Hadoop 2.0 New Features- NameNode High Availability, HDFS Federation, MRv2, YARN, Running MRv1 in YARN.

 

 

 

UNIT-V

 

HIVE AND HIVEQL, HBASE:-Hive Architecture and Installation, Comparison with Traditional Database, HiveQL – Querying Data – Sorting And Aggregating, Map Reduce Scripts, Joins & Subqueries, HBase concepts- Advanced Usage, Schema Design, Advance Indexing – PIG, Zookeeper – how it helps in monitoring a cluster, HBase uses Zookeeper and how to Build Applications with Zookeeper.

 

Reference Books

 

  1. Boris lublinsky, Kevin t. Smith, Alexey Yakubovich, “Professional Hadoop Solutions”, Wiley, ISBN: 9788126551071, 2015.
  2. Chris Eaton, Dirk deroos et al. , “Understanding Big data ”, McGraw Hill, 2012.
  3. Tom White, “HADOOP: The definitive Guide” , O Reilly 2012.
  4. Vignesh Prajapati, “Big Data Analytics with R and Haoop”, Packet Publishing 2013.
  5. Tom Plunkett, Brian Macdonald et al, “Oracle Big Data Handbook”, Oracle Press, 2014.
  6. Jy Liebowitz, “Big Data and Business analytics”,CRC press, 2013.

 

Student Activity:

  1. Collect real time data and justify how it has become Big Data
  2. Reduce the dimensionality of a big data using your own  map reducer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster 1 Paper-VIII : Elective –A-3)

 

COMPUTING FOR DATA ANALYTICS

 

 

Course Objectives

The objective of this course is to teach fundamental concepts and tools needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in Organizations.

 

Course Outcomes

  1. Learn the Big Data in Technology Perspective.
  2. Understanding of the statistical procedures most often used by practicing engineers
  3. Understand Forecasting methods and apply for business applications.

 

UNIT – I

DATA ANALYTICS LIFE CYCLE: Introduction to Big data Business Analytics – State of  the practice in analytics role of data scientists – Key roles for successful analytic project – Main phases of life cycle – Developing core deliverables for stakeholders.

 

UNIT – II

STATISTICS Sampling Techniques : Data classification, Tabulation, Frequency and Graphic representation – Measures of central value – Arithmetic mean, Geometric mean, Harmonic mean, Mode, Median, Quartiles, Deciles, Percentile – Measures of variation – Range, IQR, Quartile deviation, Mean deviation, standard deviation, coefficient

variance, skewness, Moments & Kurtosis.

 

UNIT – III

PROBABILITY AND HYPOTHESIS TESTING: Random variable, distributions, two dimensional R.V, joint probability function, marginal density function. Random vectors – Some special probability distribution – Binomial, Poison, Geometric, uniform, exponential, normal, gamma and Erlang. Multivariate normal distribution – Sampling distribution – Estimation – point, confidence – Test of significance, 1& 2 tailed test, uses of t-distribution, F-distribution, χ2distribution.

 

UNIT – IV

PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS: Predictive modeling and Analysis – Regression Analysis, Multicollinearity , Correlation analysis, Rank correlation coefficient, Multiple correlation, Least square, Curve fitting and good ness of fit.

 

UNIT – V

TIME SERIES FORECASTING AND DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS :Forecasting Models for Time series : MA, SES, TS with trend, season – Design of Experiments, one way classification, two way classification, ANOVA, Latin square, Factorial Design.

 

 

 

 

Reference Books

 

  1. Chris Eaton, Dirk Deroos, Tom Deutsch etal., “Understanding Big Data”, McGrawHIll, 2012.
  2. Alberto Cordoba , “Understanding the Predictive Analytics Lifecycle”, Wiley, 2014.
  3. Eric Siegel, Thomas H. Davenport , “Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die”, Wiley, 2013.
  4. James R Evans, “Business Analytics – Methods, Models and Decisions”, Pearson 2013.
  5. R. N. Prasad, Seema Acharya, “Fundamentals of Business Analytics”, Wiley, 2015.
  6. S M Ross, “Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists”, Academic Foundation, 2011.
  7. David Hand, Heiki Mannila, Padhria Smyth, “Principles of Data Mining”, PHI 2013.
  8. Spyros Makridakis, Steven C Wheelwright, Rob J Hyndman, “Forecasting methods and applications”, Wiley 2013( Reprint).

 

 

Student Activity:

    1. Collect temperatures of previous months and prepare a logic to estimate the temperature of next one week
    2. Collect real time data and apply statistical techniques to classify it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster 2) Paper-VIII : Elective –B-1

 

Distributed Systems

Course Objectives

  • To expose the fundamentals of distributed computer systems, assuming the availability of facilities for data transmission.
  • To discuss multiple levels of distributed algorithms, distributed file systems, distributed databases, security and protection.

 

Course Outcomes

  • Create models for distributed systems.
  • Apply different techniques learned in the distributed system.

 

UNIT I

Introduction to Distributed Computing Systems, System Models, and Issues in Designing a Distributed Operating System, Examples of distributed systems.

 

UNIT II

 

Features of Message Passing System, Synchronization and Buffering, Introduction to RPC and its models, Transparency of RPC, Implementation Mechanism, Stub Generation and RPC Messages, Server Management, Call Semantics, Communication Protocols and Client Server Binding.

 

UNIT III

 

Introduction, Design and implementation of DSM system, Granularity and Consistency Model, Advantages of DSM, Clock Synchronization, Event Ordering, Mutual exclusion, Deadlock, Election Algorithms.

 

UNIT IV

 

Task Assignment Approach, Load Balancing Approach, Load Sharing Approach, Process Migration and Threads.

 

UNIT V

 

File Models, File Accessing Models, File Sharing Semantics, File Caching Schemes, File Replication, Atomic Transactions, Cryptography, Authentication, Access control and Digital Signatures.

Reference Books

1.Pradeep. K. Sinha: “ Distributed Operating Systems: Concepts and Design ” , PHI, 2007.

2 .George Coulouris, Jean Dollimore, Tim Kindberg: “ Distributed Systems” , Concept and Design, 3rd Edition, Pearson Education, 2005.

 

Student Activity

 

  1. Implementation of Distributed Mutual Exclusion Algorithm.
  2. Create a Distributed Simulation Environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster 2 ) Paper-VIII : Elective –B-2

Cloud Computing

Course Objectives:

The student will learn about the cloud environment, building software systems and components that scale to millions of users in modern internet, cloud concepts capabilities across the various cloud service models including Iaas,  Paas, Saas, and developing  cloud based software applications on top of cloud platforms.

 

Course Outcomes

  1. Compare the strengths and limitations of cloud computing
  2. Identify the architecture, infrastructure and delivery models of cloud computing
  3. Apply suitable virtualization concept.
  4. Choose the appropriate cloud player , Programming Models and approach.
  5. Address the core issues of cloud computing such as security, privacy and interoperability
  6. Design Cloud Services and Set a private cloud

 

Unit 1

Cloud Computing Overview – Origins of Cloud computing – Cloud components – Essential characteristics – On-demand self-service , Broad network access , Location independent resource pooling , Rapid elasticity , Measured service

Unit II

Cloud scenarios – Benefits: scalability , simplicity , vendors ,security. Limitations – Sensitive information – Application development – Security concerns – privacy concern with a third party – security level of third party – security benefits Regularity issues: Government policies

Unit III

Cloud architecture: Cloud delivery model – SPI framework , SPI evolution , SPI vs. traditional IT Model

Software as a Service (SaaS): SaaS service providers – Google App Engine, Salesforce.com and google platfrom – Benefits – Operational benefits – Economic benefits – Evaluating SaaS

Platform as a Service ( PaaS ): PaaS service providers – Right Scale – Salesforce.com – Rackspace – Force.com – Services and Benefits

Unit IV

Infrastructure as a Service ( IaaS):  IaaS service providers – Amazon EC2 , GoGrid – Microsoft soft implementation and support – Amazon EC service level agreement – Recent developments – Benefits
Cloud deployment model : Public clouds – Private clouds – Community clouds – Hybrid clouds – Advantages of Cloud computing

Unit V

Virtualization: Virtualization and cloud computing – Need of virtualization – cost , administration , fast deployment , reduce infrastructure cost – limitations

Types of hardware virtualization: Full virtualization – partial virtualization – para virtualization

Desktop virtualization: Software virtualization – Memory virtualization – Storage virtualization – Data virtualization – Network virtualization
Microsoft Implementation: Microsoft Hyper V – Vmware features and infrastructure – Virtual Box – Thin client

Reference Books

  1. Cloud computing a practical approach – Anthony T.Velte , Toby J. Velte Robert Elsenpeter TATA McGraw- Hill , New Delhi – 2010
  2. Cloud Computing: Web-Based Applications That Change the Way You Work and Collaborate Online – Michael Miller – Que 2008
  3. Cloud Computing, Theory and Practice, Dan C Marinescu, MK Elsevier.
  4.  Cloud Computing, A Hands on approach, Arshadeep Bahga, Vijay Madisetti, University Press
  5. Mastering Cloud Computing, Foundations and Application Programming, Raj Kumar Buyya, Christenvecctiola, S Tammarai selvi, TMH

 

Student Activity:

  1. Prepare the list of companies providing cloud services category wise.
  2. Create a private cloud using local server

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III YEAR VI SEMESTER

(Cluster 2) Paper-VIII :  Elective –B-3

 

Grid Computing

Course Objectives:

The student will learn about the Grid environment, building software systems and components that scale to millions of users in modern internet, Grid concepts capabilities across the various Grid services..

 

Course Outcomes

  1. Compare the strengths and limitations of Grid computing
  2. Identify the architecture, infrastructure and delivery models of  Grid computing
  3. Apply suitable virtualization concept.
  4. Address the core issues of Grid computing such as security, privacy and interoperability

 

UNIT I

 

CONCEPTS AND ARCHITECTURE :Introduction-Parallel and Distributed Computing-Cluster Computing-Grid Computing- Anatomy and Physiology of Grid- Web and Grid Services-Grid Standards – OGSA-WSRF – Trends, Challenges and applications.

 

UNIT II

 

GRID MONITORING :Grid Monitoring Architecture (GMA) – An Overview of Grid Monitoring Systems- R-GMA –Grid ICE – MDS- Service Level Agreements (SLAs) -Other Monitoring Systems- Ganglia, Grid Mon, Hawkeye and Network Weather Service.

 

UNIT III

 

GRID SECURITY AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: Grid Security-A Brief Security Primer-PKI-X509 Certificates-Grid Security-Grid Scheduling and Resource Management, Grid way and Grid bus Broker-principles of Local Schedulers- Overview of Condor, SGE, PBS, LSF -Grid Scheduling with QoS.

 

UNIT IV

 

DATA MANAGEMENT AND GRID PORTALS :Data Management-Categories and Origins of Structured Data-Data Management Challenges-Architectural Approaches-Collective Data Management Services-Federation Services-Grid Portals-Generations of Grid Portals.

 

UNIT V

 

GRID MIDDLEWARE: List of globally available Middleware’s – Case Studies-Recent version of Globus Toolkit and gLite – Architecture, Components and Features. Features of Next generation grid.

 

 

Reference Books

 

  1. Ian Foster, Carl Kesselman, The Grid 2: Blueprint for a New Computing Infrastructure, Elsevier Series, 2004.
  2. Vladimir Silva, Grid Computing for Developers, Charles River Media, January 2006.
  3. Parvin Asadzadeh, Rajkumar Buyya, Chun Ling Kei,Deepa Nayar, and Srikumar Venugopal, Global Grids and Software Toolkits: A Study of Four Grid Middleware Technologies, High Performance Computing : Paradigm and Infrastructure, Laurence Yang and Minyi Guo (editor s), Wiley Press, New Jersey, USA, June 2005.
  4. Jarek Nabrzyski, Jennifer M. Schopf, Jan Weglarz , Grid Resource Management: State of the Art and Future Trends , (International Series in Operations Research & Management Science), Springer; First edition, 2003

Student Activity:

  1. Implement and analyze any one Grid Resource Sharing algorithm.
  2. Listout various security issues with Grid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROJECT & VIVA-VOCE

 

The objective of the project is to motivate them to work in emerging/latest technologies, help the students to develop ability, to apply theoretical and practical tools/techniques to solve real life problems related to industry, academic institutions and research laboratories.

The project is of 2 hours/week for one (semester VI) semester duration and a student is expected to do planning, analyzing, designing, coding, and implementing the project. The initiation of project should be with the project proposal. The synopsis approval will be given by the project guides.

The project proposal should include the following:

 

  •  Title
  •  Objectives
  •  Input and output
  •  Details of modules and process logic
  •  Limitations of the project
  •  Tools/platforms, Languages to be used
  •  Scope of future application

 

The Project work should be either an individual one or a group of not more than three members and submit a project report at the end of the semester. The students shall defend their dissertation in front of experts during viva-voce examinations.

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DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

I  SEMESTER TIME TABLE

 

1
10 AM – 11 AM
2
11 AM – 12
3
12 – 1 PM
  4
2 PM –  3 PM
5
3 PM – 4 PM
6
4 PM – 5 PM
MON III MPCS LAB L U N C H      B R E A K III MECS LAB
II MPCS I MPCS III MECS
TUE I MECS LAB II MECS LAB
III MPCS III MECS III MPCS I MPCS III MECS
WED II MPCS LAB
III MPCS II MECS III MPCS II MPCS I MECS
THU
III MECS I MECS I MPCS II MECS
FRI I MPCS I MECS I MPCS LAB
III MPCS II MECS III MECS III MPCS II MPCS
SAT III MECS LAB
I MECS II MPCS II MECS III MECS

 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

II  SEMESTER TIME TABLE

 

1
10 AM – 11 AM
2
11 AM – 12
3
12 – 1 PM
  4
2 PM –  3 PM
5
3 PM – 4 PM
6
4 PM – 5 PM
MON III MECS LAB L  U  N  C  H            B  R  E  A  K CLUSTER – II
II MPCS I MPCS
TUE I MECS LAB II MECS LAB
III MECS III MPCS I MPCS CLUSTER-I CLUSTER-II
WED II MPCS LAB II MPCS I MECS
II MECS CLUSTER-I CLUSTER-II PROJECT
THU III MPCS LAB CLUSTER-I CLUSTER-II II MECS
III MECS I MECS I MPCS PROJECT
FRI III MECS I MECS III MPCS I MPCS LAB
I MPCS II MECS CLUSTER-II PROJECT II MPCS
SAT III MPCS
II MPCS II MECS I MECS CLUSTER – I

 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

ACTION PLAN (2018-2019)

 

In addition to the Regular Curriculum, the following activities undertaken by the Computer Science Department of the College.

 

Time Period Academic Activity
June to July Communication Skills in association with English Department
Week Ends Analytical skills and reasoning coaching in association with Department of Mathematics

of the College

October or March (Before semester end exams) Industrial Trips
September or February Months Seminars & Workshops
April to June Summer Projects
Daily 1hour for 3rd Year Students M.Sc. (PG) Entrance Coaching
1st Year Students in the month of July Remedial Classes
September & October Months Mid Exams
Last weeks of October & February Semester and Practical Exams
November & March Semester End Exams

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

UNIVERSITY TOPPERS LIST

 

Academic Year 2017-18

 

S. No Hall Ticket No Student Name Year & Group CGPA Place
01 S1500142047 Mr. S.Anantha III B. Sc- MPCS 9.5 01
02 S1500142050 Miss. U.Pushpa Latha III B.Sc. – MPCS 9.2 05
03 S1500142024 Miss. K.Sailaja III B.Sc. – MPCS 9.1 07
04. S1500142045 Miss. S.Sivani III B.Sc. – MPCS 9.1 07
05. 1700142050 Mr. S.Chalapathi I B.Sc. MPCS 9.2 04
06. 1700142045 Mr. P. Venkata Sai I B.Sc. MPCS 9.2 05
07. 1600142035 Mr. P.Veeranjaneyulu II B.Sc. MPCS 9.04 06

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM
RESULT ANALYSIS
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
2013-14
Lecturer Name: CH.M.K.HARI
B.SRINIVAS
Sl.No Paper Subject Appeared Passed Percentage
1 III DBMS 53 45 84.9056604
2 IV WEB TECHNOLOGIES 53 45 84.9056604
3 II JAVA & DATA STRUCTURE 33 29 87.8787879
4 I PC SOFTWARE & C LANGUAGE 26 25 96.1538462
 

RESULT ANALYSIS – CHART

 

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM
RESULT ANALYSIS
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
2014-15
Lecturer Name: CH.M.K.HARI
B.SRINIVAS
Sl.No Paper Subject Appeared Passed Percentage
1 III DBMS 29 26 89.66
2 IV WEB TECHNOLOGIES 29 26 89.66
3 II JAVA & DATA STRUCTURE 55 52 94.55
4 I PC SOFTWARE & C LANGUAGE 49 43 87.76
RESULT ANALYSIS – CHART

 

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM
RESULT ANALYSIS
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
2015-16
Lecturer Name: BINGI SRINIVAS
Sl.No Paper Subject Appeared Passed Percentage
1 III DBMS 46 33 71.74
2 IV WEB TECHNOLOGIES 46 33 71.74
3 S-I PC SOFTWARE & MS OFFICE 97 84 86.60
4 S-2 C LANGUAGE 97 85 87.63
5 II JAVA & DATA STRUCTURE 49 35 71.43
RESULT ANALYSIS – CHART

 

 

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (M), SRIKAKULAM
RESULT ANALYSIS
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
2016-2017
Lecturer Name: BINGI SRINIVAS
Sl.No Paper Subject Appeared Passed Percentage
1 III DBMS 46 40 86.96
2 IV WEB TECHNOLOGIES 46 40 86.96
3 S-3 JAVA 90 72 80.00
4 S4 DATASTRUCTURES 90 74 82.22
5 S-I PC SOFTWARE & PHOTOSHOP 101 71 70.30
6 S-2 C LANGUAGE 96 69 71.88
RESULT ANALYSIS – CHART

 

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE(MEN), SRIKAKULAM

RESULT ANALYSIS

2017-18

Lecturer Names:                                       B.Srinivas,

                                                                        P.Tarakeswara Rao

 

Sl.No Paper Subject Appeared Passed Percentage
1 S-I PC SOFTWARE & PHOTOSHOP 112 87 77.68
2 S-2 C LANGUAGE 110 75 68.18
3 S-3 JAVA 87 54 62.07
4 S-4 DATASTRUCTURES 95 75 78.95
5 S-5 DBMS 84 76 90.48
6 S-6 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING 84 81 96.43
7 S-7 WEB TECHNOLOGIES 82 74 90.24

 

 

 

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (M), SRIKAKULAM

YEAR WISE RESULT ANALYSIS

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Name of the Course Year Appeared Passed Percentage
B.Sc. (MPCS) 2013-14 112 99 88.39
B.Sc. (MPCS & MECS 2014-15 133 121 90.98
2015-16 192 152 79.17
2016-17 232 183 78.88
2017-18 289 243 84.08

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE (MEN), SRIKAKULAM

INTERNET FACILITY ‘e’ LEARNING

 

S. No Paper/Subject URL
1  

 

 

C

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(programming_language)
2 https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/c-language-set-1-introduction/
3 https://www.programiz.com/c-programming
4 www.powershow.com/view/1555fc-ZWNmY/Introduction
5 www.slideshare.net/sarah_jumali/1-introduction
6 ·         www.free- power-point -templates.com
7 absa.org/pdf/ABSAGeneralMicrobiologyFactSheets.pdf
8 DBMS https://www.tutorialspoint.com/dbms/
9 https://www.javatpoint.com/dbms-tutorial
10 https://www.studytonight.com/dbms/
11 JAVA https://www.javatpoint.com/java-tutorial
12 https://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/
13 https://www.guru99.com/java-tutorial.html

[TABS_R id=858]

Seminars/Workshops Conducted

 

National /State/Regional conferences/workshops/Seminars organized

 

2017-18

S.No Departments Dates Title of the Conference / workshop/Seminar conducted Names of Resource persons
1 Computer Science 22-11-2017 1-Day district Level Workshop On “CBCS” Syllabus on computer science subjects Prof.T.Kama Raju

DEAN, Examinations

Dr.B.R.Ambedkar University, Etcherla

 

Dr. Siva Prasad

Lecturer in Computer Science

GDC, Tekkali

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seminars/Workshops Conducted

 

National /State/Regional conferences/workshops/Seminars organized

 

2017-18

S.No Departments Dates Title of the Conference / workshop/Seminar conducted Names of Resource persons
1 Computer Science 22-11-2017 1-Day district Level Workshop On “CBCS” Syllabus on computer science subjects Prof.T.Kama Raju

DEAN, Examinations

Dr.B.R.Ambedkar University, Etcherla

 

Dr. Siva Prasad

Lecturer in Computer Science

GDC, Tekkali

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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